Cannes Day 4: Heli Premiere

Day 4 was the big premiere for Heli, a spanish film written and directed by Amat Escalante.  The film was absolutely fantastic.  First of all, it provided a fantastic story, simple in its elegance.  About a young man, Heli, who has to fight for his wife and younger sister after randomly being in the wrong place at the wrong time and getting into trouble with the Mexican drug cartel.  He is wrongfully blamed for losing a supply of drugs.  The best part of the film was the cinematography.  Everything was just…off about it.  It was shot as if they were shooting a documentary–lots of hand-held, back seat of the car shots that are also comparable to stuff Jean Luc Godard shot.  He also locks the camera off a lot for long takes and doesn’t seem to care if the subject is within the frame or not.  It was great.  There was also no soundtrack, which added to the overt realism of the project.

It was so cool being on the red carpet with all the photographers this time!

It was so cool being on the red carpet with all the photographers this time!

=)

=)

The best part about the screening was that we not only found a way to sneak around the line and go through a side entrance from everyone else, but then our tickets–which were supposed to be for the balcony–got instantly upgraded to the orchestra!  They were trying to fill seats in the large pit section up front.  So then they walked us down to two rows in front of where the stars of the film were about to sit down.

It was so surreal to watch them walk in.  Now I had no idea who they were, or who the director was, or other things that they have done, but they were treated like royalty.  The entire Grand Lumiere theater was cheering for these three.

It was so surreal to watch them walk in. Now I had no idea who they were, or who the director was, or other things that they have done, but they were treated like royalty. The entire Grand Lumiere theater was cheering for these three.

The film was so powerful.  It's simplicity was it's best point.  The dialogue was short and brief, and he let the action speak louder than the words.  At the end of the film, there was a 10 minute standing ovation.  I couldn't imagine the feeling they were going through for it.

The film was so powerful. It’s simplicity was it’s best point. The dialogue was short and brief, and he let the action speak louder than the words. At the end of the film, there was a 10 minute standing ovation. I couldn’t imagine the feeling they were going through for it.

 

Advertisements
WordPress.com.
%d bloggers like this: